The National BAME Youth Unemployment Survey 2010


The study, which was conducted in partnership with the Roots Research Centre, the Centre for Local Policy Studies, Edge Hill University, and Equanomics UK, looked at employment experiences and barriers facing British Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) youth, across four cities: London, Liverpool, Leicester and Sheffield.

Consultations were conducted with BAME 18-24 year olds that were unemployed and not in education or training.

The project was designed and conducted by young BAME researchers, who were also unemployed (and not in education or training). They found that:

· Race discrimination (perceived and actual) was a key issue for the young BAME participants, particularly during the employment recruitment process.

· Postcode snobbery and being judged on the area you lived was also a major problem in Liverpool, Leicester and Sheffield.

· There is a need for more Black-owned businesses, particularly in cities outside of London, in order to raise aspirations and job opportunities within Black communities.

· There is also a need to promote the benefits of education and having long-term goals, as due to the high rates of graduate unemployment many young people are seeing it as a waste of time and are looking for quick-fix solutions, which do not provide them with sustainable career prospects.

· The psychological effects of youth unemployment should not go unnoticed. Many of the young people described feelings of stress, depression and self-worthlessness as a result of being out of work.

Key recommendations from the young people came out of the Study, particularly with regards to:

· Improving how young people interact with the Job Centre Plus and making its services more tailored to their needs.

· How to raise young people’s aspirations and positively influence their attitudes when looking for work.

· What schools can do differently in order to communicate the economic worth of education and encourage students to aim higher.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: